Environment

Agilyx Supplies Recycled Plastic Waste Derived Feedstock For Low-Carbon Aviation Fuel

Agilyx, a company focusing on the conversion of waste plastics to fuels and chemicals, recently announced a collaborative agreement with Monroe Energy to supply up to 2,5000 barrels per day of Agilyx's synthetic feedstock, as a base for a lower-carbon crude oil for jet fuel production.

Agilyx derives the feedstock, Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) registered Agilyx Synthetic Crude Oil ("ASCO") product, through a proprietary waste plastics recycling technology.

Agilyx has agreed to supply ASCO to Monroe Energy, a wholly owned subsidiary of Delta Air Lines. Monroe will refine the ASCO into jet fuel for Delta. Agilyx plans to locate a production facility near Monroe's refinery, which is located just outside of Philadelphia, developing the plant in phases until it reaches a production capacity of 2,500 bbl per day by [the end of 2020].

"This is a capstone achievement for Agilyx," said Joe Vaillancourt, Agilyx's chief executive officer. "We are very excited to be working with Monroe Energy and Delta. As we advance the number and types of products we are able to make from waste plastics, this project marks the first truly commercial-scale facility that will advance the new plastics economy."

Agilyx , which is based in Tigard, Ore., has Virgin Group founder Sir Richard Branson as an early investor.

Sir Richard said: "This is a major step forward in the search for a cost effective low carbon aviation fuel. The beauty of the Agilyx process is it will take waste plastics which are a major problem for the environment and turn it into something useful. I am excited by the opportunity and pleased that Monroe Energy and Delta are looking to collaborate on this ground breaking project."

"The Agilyx technology is an innovative process, reducing the amount of plastic that is currently being landfilled," said Jeff Warmann, CEO – Monroe Energy. "I am proud that our company can play such a significant role in converting waste plastics into useful jet fuel for Delta."